Tag Archives: sugarfree

Low Carb Chocolate Bourbon Mug Cake

17 Dec

Converting to a low carb lifestyle has had its ups & downs. At the start of our journey, both Scott & I encountered times in which we would have eaten the cardboard box our Amazon goods arrived in, out of sheer desperation. If you would have asked us on Day 4 if this is something we could live with long-term, we would have eaten your first born told you that neither of us thought this is something that would last past Week 1. Barring a small miracle, we likely would have not made it to the end of Week 2 if it weren’t for my personal tenacity and Teutonic nature.

Fast forward to Week 29, and I can easily look at a plate of Christmas cookies and simply shrug my shoulders in deflated enthusiasm. Never in a million years would I have ever thought I could come to this point and, in hindsight, I realize now just how much of a sugar addict I was. Nowadays, I rarely crave sugary or carb-laden foods, but around that special time of the month occasionally, I have a hankering for something other than cheese or salami. A while back, probably about a month into our new lifestyle, I invested in a 48oz bag of Erythritol. It’s a natural sweetener, a sugar alcohol with zero digestible carbs and is often used within the diabetic community. It measures 1:1 like sugar, and tastes practically the same though when eaten in large quantities can cause a bit of stomach upset for some people. Since we eat so little of it in one go, it works well for those times in which we want something sweeter.

The chocolate mug cake below came from a fabulous low carb blogger named Kim, aka ‘Low Carb Maven’.  I did make a few adjustments as I wanted it a tad sweeter and boozier more festive, but check out her original recipe. It’s a winner, for sure!

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LOW CARB CHOCOLATE BOURBON MUG CAKE

Inspired by Low Carb Maven

– 2 Tbsp of almond flour, sifted

– 1 Tbs of unsweetened natural cacao powder, sifted

– 1 to 1 ½ Tbsp of 1:1 sugar substitute/sweetener  (I used Swerve)

– ¼ tsp of baking powder

– 1 Tbsp of mayonnaise

– 1 large egg yolk

– 1 tsp of Bourbon (or water, or another liquor of your choice)

– ¼ tsp of vanilla extract

Sift all dry ingredients into a microwave-safe cup or ramekin. Add egg yolk, mayo, Bourbon and vanilla extract, and mix well with a fork until it’s all incorporated and looks like a thick batter.

Microwave on high for 50-60 seconds.

Top with sugar-free whipped cream or keto-friendly ice cream for a real treat, but the cake itself is pretty tasty as is. Enjoy!

Omoe Jozefa’s homemade mustard

5 Jul

Since I posted a recipe for homemade ketchup yesterday, it’s only befitting that I would post one for mustard today. After all, ketchup & mustard belong together like Siegfried & Roy. Seperate them, and – well – things are just not right.

While it’s not a Belgian invention, mustard is another one of those Belgian staples. It’s served alongside everything. If you hail from a small Flemish country town like I do, you surely remember the annual Summer ‘Breugel Feesten’ where you are traditionally presented with a plate of diced gouda & paté of pheasant or wild boar, served alongside a bowl of zesty ‘cornichons & ajuintjes’, tiny little pickled dill gerkins & onions… all to be washed down with a nice dark Leffe ‘van ‘t vat’ (Leffe beer on tap).

Mustard is ridiculously easy to make, albeit a bit time consuming as it requires some planning ahead. You’ll find many mustard recipes online, but the basic recipe below comes from my very own grandma Jozefa, bless her soul. She made sure that I understood the importance of using non-reactive utensils and unsuccesfully taught me the virtue of being patient. Mustard is really nothing more than a combination of ground (or powdered) mustard seed and some sort of liquid, blended together with any flavorings you fancy.

There’s a few tips I can pass along to you:

  • For a spicy and flavorful mustard, always use a combination of yellow, brown and/or black mustard seed. Yellow seed is fairly mild and – when used alone – typically yield a ‘flat’ or very mild mustard. For a bolder flavor, you need to add some black mustard seed.
  • To change the flavor, experiment by swapping liquids (beer, champagne, white wine…) and adding additional flavorings (tarragon leaves, honey…)
  • When adding the liquids to the ground mustard seed, the temperature of the liquid makes a difference too: hot liquids yield a more mild mustard whereas cold liquids give it more kick or bite.
  • The longer mustard ‘sits’, the milder it gets. Don’t be alarmed if your mustard tastes too spicy right after you made it, it’ll definitely ‘calm down’ in a few days to a week.

HOMEMADE MUSTARD – THE BASICS  (yields approx. 5oz of mustard)
– 2oz of mustard seed (I use even quantities of yellow, black & red or brown mustard seed)
– 3.5 fl oz of white wine vinegar (or champagne vinegar)
– 3.5 fl oz of water
– pinch of salt, to your liking
– pinch of sugar or 1 tsp of honey, if you like your mustard a bit sweet

Place the mustard seed in an airtight glass (or non-reactive) jar with the water and vinegar. Shake well and let sit for 24-48 hours.
In a food processor (or with mortar & pestle), pulverize the soaked seeds until you get a nice creamy paste. This takes a bit of time, so be patient. For a more grainy mustard, blend less. For a creamier mustard, keep on blending until you achieve the desired creaminess. Add a bit more water one tbsp at a time if it all turns out a bit too grainy and dry. Also, homemade mustard is not quite as ‘yellow’ in color as store-bought mustard. If you fancy that yellow color, add a dash of kurkuma for color.

BEER-THYME MUSTARD
Use basic recipe above, but replace water & vinegar with 4.5oz of full-bodied red or amber ale (or stout), and 2.5oz of champagne vinegar. Once blended, add 1-2 tsp of finely chopped fresh thyme leaves.

HONEY-DILL MUSTARD
Use basic recipe above. When the mustard is blended to your desired creaminess, add a 1-2 tbsp of honey and a whopping tbsp of chopped dill.

LEMON-TARRAGON MUSTARD
Use basic recipe above. When blended, add 1-2 tsp of fresh lemon zest and 1 tbsp of finely chopped fresh tarragon leaves

ROSEMARY MUSTARD
Use basic recipe above. When blended, add 2 tbsp of very finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves

Homemade mustard lasts approx. 1 month in an airtight container in your refrigerator. Before using, allow it to sit for approx. 5 days so the ‘fire’ dies down a bit and the flavors have a chance to blend together.

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